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  • George Groves
    Technology Journalist

    George Groves is a writer interested in all forms of technology, creativity and digital trends

    George Groves
    Technology Journalist

    George Groves is a writer interested in all forms of technology, creativity and digital trends

    The hipster trend is on the decline, but now we have another on our hands. It’s time to meet your new customers.

    First we had yuppies. Then post-GFC it was all about muppies (millennial-yuppie hybrids). Now we have yuccies, spawned from the collision of yuppie and hipster culture.

    The so-called ‘Young Urban Creative’ is likely to reside somewhere gentrified, like Footscray or Paddington. On a Friday evening they’re probably sampling whatever that new food truck in town is giving out.

    They walk like a hipster, talk like a hipster, but unlike a hipster they like money. And probably have more of it to spend, thanks in part to their desire to make a decent living off their passions.

    So let’s trim the beards, cover up the tattoos and explore the key traits to look out for in your new customers.

    Group of young people shopping

    1. They respond to brands differently

    Part of the yuccies’ upbringing in middle class suburbia afforded them the opportunity to follow creative passions from a young age. But instead of putting away the paintbrush to study commerce, they have had the old adage of following your dreams deeply ingrained in them.

    Deeply responsive to brands and marketing efforts, but not in the way you’d expect. They’d be more likely to choose not to shop somewhere that has a bad brand, than shop somewhere because they have a good one.

    For your business, this means you need to make sure your brand is on point. They will notice if it isn’t.

    2. They’re always connected

    Hungry for content, the yuccie is most likely a digital omnivore. They stay connected on mobile, tablets, and they demand a high-speed connection at home.

    Part of this constant connection is their desire to buy when they want and how they want. Unless you sell something that requires a physical presence, you’d better be selling online. For the yuccie it’s all about frictionless retail.

    3. They make their own decisions

    Though a trend amongst most millennials, the yuccie is more likely to consult their phone rather than talk to a salesperson. Think of how much easier it is to Google product reviews – within minutes you can know what to buy without needing to talk.

    It’s a trait that makes being adaptive to trends like omni-channel shopping so important. A yuccie in need is a sale waiting to happen.

    4. They have spending power

    That whole following your dreams thing? The yuccie actually does it. And they’re more likely to succeed at it. Where a hipster will most likely be a ‘slashie’ (working as a barista to fund their creative pursuit as a poet), the yuccie will find a way to make a tidy profit. Just look at any advertising agency. You’ll find swarms of them.

    They’re probably renting with roommates too, which boosts their disposable income. Fashion, dining out and entertainment are all things they’d rather invest in. 

    5. They speak their mind

    Having a presence on social media makes brands more accessible than ever. The obvious downside is that it’s easier to trash a brand’s reputation with bad reviews and social interactions. Part of the yuccie’s constant connection is a lack of restraint when it comes to their opinions towards a brand. A lack of customer service will most likely end in a bad review on Yelp or Facebook.

    Businesses can work to build a relationship with yuccies on social media. This will both help in delivering customer service and giving your business an easy source of feedback to improve its offering.

    Millenials are fast becoming the biggest consumer and working class in Australia.

    Learn how they’re working by their own rules.

    Find Out MoreMillenials are fast becoming the biggest consumer and working class in Australia.

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